Archive for November, 2013

24
Nov

Hey juniors! We have a super short week (only two days of wonderful learning fun!), but I think that you’ll enjoy the work that we’re going to do. Take a look at the week below.

Monday: After a short warm-up that will start the week off right quick with a fairly provocative question related to Walden. As you know, last week we talked briefly about whether or not y’all thought that the notions put forth by Thoreau and Emerson were even tenable in our modern society. We’ll be continuing that conversation on Monday through our warm-up. Afterwards, I have a short jigsaw assignment for Walden that you’ll need a group of a few students.

Homework: Finish your jigsaw work. You’ll be presenting your findings on Tuesday.

Tuesday: As I’m sure you can guess, Tuesday will be an opportunity for you, in your small groups, to present your findings on Walden and its salient points. I will post our collective findings after class in another post.

Homework: Read Whitman’s Leaves of Grass for class on Monday. There will be a quiz.

Category : 11th Grade | Blog
17
Nov

Hey young ones! As we wade deeper in the murky waters of Shakespeare’s Macbeth we’ll be spending some time this week watching film and learning how to do a properly good close reading of a text. Check it out below, yo.

Monday: We will begin the week by doing a close reading of Lady Macbeth’s soliloquy in I.iii. I will be teaching you what I want you to be able to do when you do a close reading of a text, and it is a somewhat involved process. We will be practicing this skill all week, and for the remainder of the year, really. This will tie in to our Dialectical Journals for this particular text as well.

Homework: Read II.i and II.ii

Tuesday: We’ll be doing some close readings in class (yes, these will count for your Dialectical Journals), and then taking a look at my favorite scene of the whole play, the Porter scene in II.iii.

Homework: Read II.iii

Wednesday: We will be reviewing Act II by making our own discussion questions while making use of Bloom’s taxonomy. You’ll turn these in at the end of class.

Homework: Read III.i-III.iii

Thursday: Um… We’ll probably be reviewing the first part of Act III, but I’m not entirely sure what we’ll be doing. I’ll keep you posted (get it?).

Homework: Read III.v-III.vi, turn in your TKAM essay by 11:59:59

Friday: We will watch a good portion of Act III, and I also have a mini-quote quiz for you in which I will ask you to identify the speaker and significance of a number of important passages thus far through the play.

Homework: Read Act IV.

Category : Honors 10 | Blog
17
Nov

Haaaaappppy Monday, young ones! This is going to be a super, super awesome week. We’ll be moving from Romanticism into Transcendentalism, which is consistently one of my favorite units of the entire year. Strap in, because this week is a bit of a wild ride through some of the most progressive thinkers in the history of American letters.

Monday: On Monday I have a bit of a lecture on Transcendentalism. I will be asking you to take notes, and they will be used and referred to for most of the remainder of the unit. If you’re gone, please make arrangements to get the notes from a classmate. Afterwards, I will be handing out our packets of Transcendentalist readings and outlining, in brief, their contents.

Time allowing, I’ll be checking/stamping your thesis statements for our Romantic essay.

Homework: Read through Emerson’s Self-Reliance.

Tuesday: I have another lecture on Tuesday, but it is one that is more of an interactive drawing. I know, it sounds like it will be bizarre, but I promise you’ll enjoy it. Afterwards, I have a short exercise in which you’ll be asked to explain some of the more interesting passages in the text.

Wednesday: On Wednesday we have Ms. Gordon coming in to discuss the upcoming blood drive. Once she is done we will move on and discuss the previous day’s work, which I will be stamping for credit. We’ll end the day with a period during which we’ll be peer editing our Romanticism essays.

Homework: Read Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience.

Thursday: Thursday will begin with a quiz which will cover the reading from the previous night. Please pay special attention to the metaphors that Thoreau uses to describe himself, his society, and his government. Afterwards, we will have a set of questions and passages designed to help you understand the text more fully.

Homework: Turn in Romanticism essays by 11:59:59.

Friday: On Friday we will be discussing, via a mini-seminar, whether we think that Thoreau’s ideas in Civil Disobedience and Emerson’s thoughts in Self-Reliance are even remotely possible. At the end of the discussion you will be responsible for producing a 5-10 sentence response to the discussion. Prior to our discussion, I’ll be giving you about 30 minutes in class to finish the second part of the discussion questions for Civil Disobedience.

Homework: Read Thoreau’s Walden.

Category : 11th Grade | Blog
11
Nov

Hey s’mores! I’ll keep this short and sweet, because it’s late and I want to sleep.

Tuesday: I’ll begin the week by introducing your essays for To Kill A Mockingbird. There are a few things that I will add to the PDF outlining what you need to do, so if you’re gone make sure that you check in with a classmate to get the additional notes. Afterwards you’ll have the chance to start in on crafting a thesis that meets my approval and is stamp-worthy.

Homework: Complete your thesis for stamping first thing on Wednesday.

Wednesday: Wednesday will be a work day for y’all. It is a chance to sit and type up a rough draft, which you will need for class on Thursday for peer editing.

Homework: Finish your first draft for class on Thursday.

Thursday: Naturally, this is a peer editing day. You know how that works by now.

Friday: We’ll be starting our next novel, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, on Friday. I have something of a lecture for y’all, and we’ll look closely at the first scene together.

Homework: Read Act I.ii and I.iii

Category : Honors 10 | Blog
11
Nov

Hey look! It’s our golden week! Like a golden birthday… or something like that. It’s a short week, so naturally we’ll be working hard to fit everything in as we wrap up our unit on Romanticism and begin to think about Transcendentalism. There is also an exam this week, as I promised in class last week. I’ll post the review guide on Thursday after class. In the meantime, take a quick look at our week.

Tuesday: Our week will begin with a short quiz on the third chapter of Bartleby. Make sure you pay special attention to the end of the story and Bartleby’s fate, along with that of the narrator. During the quiz I’ll be stamping your work for chapter 2. We’ll end the week by examining chapter 3 in the same way that we have been for the previous two chapters. You can find the outline for what I need you to examine here.

Wednesday: I will be introducing our next essay of the year, The Romantic Essay. I will post the instructions after class on Wednesday, so if you’re absent be sure to check the blog for some direction.

Thursday: Thursday will be split into two parts: first, I will be giving you part of the period to work on crafting a thesis that connects the stories we have read thematically. Additionally, you will be beginning your outline. You’ll need to have these ready to use for class next Monday. Second, I will be going over what you need to review for our Romantic exam on Friday.

Friday: As you can guess, having read thus far, Friday is exam day.

Homework: Complete your thesis and outline for stamping first thing on Monday.

Category : 11th Grade | Blog
8
Nov

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Bartleby Analysis, Part 2

Examine the characters of Bartleby and the narrator. What new character traits emerge in chapter 2? Cite the text.
Examine the symbols of Wall Street and Bartleby’s savings. What does each represent, and how do Bartleby’s actions provide commentary on Wall Street?
What motifs emerge in chapter 2 that were not present in chapter 1? Which motifs from chapter 1 are seen again?
Select 2 significant passages that help to establish the story’s theme. How do they so?

Category : 11th Grade | Blog
7
Nov

Ok, s’mores. Here’s the short vocab list. Sorry for the later hour, but pass it around.

Assuaged
Impotent
Indigenous
Delegation
Iniquities
Contemptuous
Diminutive
Fraught
Monosyllabic
Judicious
Disapprobation
unfathomable
aberrations
caricatures
lineaments
ingenuous
guilelessness
deportment
obstreperous
inconspicuous
rudiments
rectitude
viscous
Irascible
Pinioned
Rout
Furtive
Connived
Bedecked
Livid
Palliation
Boded
Skulked
derisive
corpulent
sauntered
compelled
luminous
myopia
sniveling
quavered
parried
talisman
acrid
cordon
efflorescence
enmity
decorous
incredulous
bastion
hiatus
suffusion
strident

Category : Honors 10 | Blog
6
Nov

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Bartleby Analysis, Part 1

Characters – List 3 traits for each individual, including the narrator.
Setting – Describe the office, and Wall Street as well.
Motifs – What objects or actions are repeated?
Symbols – How might they connect to themes?
Significant passages – Pick two passages + provide analysis of each. Connect them to themes that you see.

Category : 11th Grade | Blog
3
Nov
Background
1.  What is the significance of the name Ethan Brand?
a.) Look up the definition of the word “brand”.
b.) Look up Ethan the Ezrahite.  Who was he?
c.) Based on what you researched above, why did Hawthorne choose this particular name for his main character
2.  What is the significance of the name Esther?
a.) Who is Esther in the story?
b.) Who is the Biblical Esther?
c.) What similarities do you see between “Ethan Brand” and the Book of Esther?
Analysis
1.  What is the Unpardonable Sin?  Does Ethan Brand really commit it?
2.  Compare/Contrast Ethan Brand with Young Goodman Brown (the characters, not the texts)
3.  Give an example of a theme or motif shared by both “Young Goodman Brown” and “Ethan Brand.”  What theme or motif is present in “Ethan Brand” that is not in “Young Goodman Brown”?
Background
1.  What is the significance of the name Ethan Brand?
a.) Look up the definition of the word “brand”.
b.) Look up Ethan the Ezrahite.  Who was he?
c.) Based on what you researched above, why did Hawthorne choose this particular name for his main character
2.  What is the significance of the name Esther?
a.) Who is Esther in the story?
b.) Who is the Biblical Esther?
c.) What similarities do you see between “Ethan Brand” and the Book of Esther?
Analysis
1.  What is the Unpardonable Sin?  Does Ethan Brand really commit it?
2.  Compare/Contrast Ethan Brand with Young Goodman Brown (the characters, not the texts)
3.  Give an example of a theme or motif shared by both “Young Goodman Brown” and “Ethan Brand.”  What theme or motif is present in “Ethan Brand” that is not in “Young Goodman Brown”?
Category : 11th Grade | Blog